Project Lists

A couple notes on the lists below.  I'm trying to figure the best way to add excel files to this site without reformatting. As you can see I haven't quite figured that out. It will get better.

Attribution and Design Credit

A few general notes about partnerships and associations.  Ruocco worked for many architects early in his career, most notably Richard Requa who gave him his first job in his office before Ruocco had graduated high school.  Generally projects from that period in his career (1925-1937) are not covered here unless there is compelling evidence that Ruocco himself played a significant role in the design.  Ruocco worked for and with Requa, William Templeton Johnson, Lillian Rice, Sam Hamill, Louis Gill and a few others during this time. 

Ruocco completed several designs on his own prior to his licensure in 1937; where known those commissions are included.  These lists focus on his work starting in 1935 which is when he began to work on his own.  His business associations and timeline are provided below for reference. The abbreviations (ex. "LR") used on the lists are keyed in the information below.

1935 Messenger Ruocco 

Brief partnership formed between Kenneth Messenger and Antonio Ruocco (using a shortened version of his middle name Pietrantonio) to provide home designs for the ModelTown exhibit that was part of the 1935 California Panama Exposition at Balboa Park. (MR) 

1935 - 1947  LPA Ruocco, Richard Requa, William Templeton Johnson, Sam Hamill, US Naval Architect 

During this period Ruocco worked for himself and also as an architect in the US Navy during WWII. He continued to work with other local architects on several large and notable commissions. (LR=Ruocco, RR=Requa, RHGJ = Requa, Johnson, Gill, Hamill)

1947 - 1959  Lloyd Ruocco Architect

This is probably the most productive period of his career.  These are the years that Lloyd and Ilse Ruocco established the Design Center.(LR)

1959 - 1961 Ruocco Delawie

Preparing for a year long trip around the world, Ruocco established a partnership with his young protege Homer Delawie. (RD)

*Delawie Blackout Projects (DB)

There are a few projects that Lloyd Ruocco designed after the Delawie partnership came to a less than amicable end but before new title blocks were developed. These were designed after Delawie had left the partnership (example Wexler Residence) These projects used the Ruocco Delawie title block but the "Delawie" is blocked out.  

*Ruocco Blackout Projects (RB)

There is at least one example where a Ruocco Delawie project had the "Ruocco" blacked out.  These projects were commissioned by the partnership and not by Delawie alone. It can be assumed that Delawie was the primary designer of these projects but since the commission was to the partnership it is likely Ruocco still had a hand in the design.

1961 - 1972  Lloyd Ruocco Architect & Planner

Following his world travels, Ruocco began to focus his efforts on city planning, creating his unpublished work "Supercity".  His office continued to design both commercial and residential projects.  Ruocco also had a few project specific partnerships at this time with Seldon Kennedy,William Rosser and Herluf Brydegaard (LR)

1972 - 1977 Lloyd Ruocco Architect

Although no projects have been confirmed post 1972 it is apparent that Ruocco remained in business through at least 1977.  His offices at the Design Center were mainly run by longtime employee Fred Meyer who started his own firm in the mid 1970s.  Meyer served as project manager for most Ruocco work from the late 60s forward. Ruocco received his FAIA (Fellow of the American Institute of Architects) in 1977 and was sponsored by his former partner Homer Delawie. 

Confirmed

Project Name                             Design                      Address                                               Comment

Attributed (Not Confirmed)

Project Name                                                  Address                                                         Comment

Erroneous Attributions

Project Name            Designer                     Type               Address                                         Comment

© 2018 Todd Pitman